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Meet Taylor Cavazos of Taylor Cavazos Art in Little Haiti

Today we’d like to introduce you to Taylor Cavazos.

So, before we jump into specific questions about what you do, why don’t you give us some details about you and your story.
I am a Mexican-American artist from the borderland of South Texas. My work takes influences from traditional Mexican art, with its bright colors, ornate details, and textured surfaces. Many of my paintings reference historical icons of Mexican culture, such as La Virgen de Guadalupe and Frida Kahlo, but I attempt to give them new life by incorporating endless dot-and-swirl patterns into all of my pieces.

I first turned to art in 2015 to cure my anxiety, transcribing my emotions into the detailed patterns you see today. Without any formal training or art background, I started to create acrylic-on-canvas pieces, from small magnets to large-scale paintings. I soon found success at local flea markets in Texas and after moving to Miami in 2018, continued to participate in art-focused events, such as the popular 305 Day in the Leah Arts District.

Today, I find Miami’s bright and vibrant culture incredibly inspiring. For me, painting is the ultimate therapy and I am so excited to continue to share my work with South Florida.

Great, so let’s dig a little deeper into the story – has it been an easy path overall and if not, what were the challenges you’ve had to overcome?
I find solace in art because it is so therapeutic. Sometimes, hours pass without me noticing as I sit on my living room floor and transcribe all my emotions onto the canvas. The struggle has been my own anxiety but art is a way to combat these emotions and make something beautiful.

Please tell us more about your artwork, what you are currently focused on and most proud of.
I’m a local artist with a larger purpose. Living with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and high-anxiety, I find solace in painting repetitive patterns. It helps me clear my mind, block out unnecessary thoughts and ultimately create something beautiful. I am a big believer in art as therapy and I hope my unique, honest approach to my art will serve as a platform to raise awareness and increase the discussion surrounding mental health issues among the Latinx community.

What were you like growing up?
I grew up in Harlingen, Texas, right along the border of Mexico. My grandmother’s family came from Monterrey, Mexico, and my grandfather’s family immigrated from Spain when they were given land grants in the late 1700s/early 1800s.

I have a huge family (so big we have to rent port-o-pottys for our Easter celebrations). We’re constantly eating, (loudly) talking, laughing, dancing and spending time together. Growing up, I remember driving to Progresso, Mexico, after church on Sundays to eat at Arturos, a local favorite. Today, we visit Mexico less often due to the violence on the border but try to go as much as we can.

I’m extremely proud of my unique upbringing and miss my family in Texas every day, but Miami (and it’s vibrant culture) reminds me of my home and for that, I am extremely grateful.

Contact Info:

Image Credit:
Taylor Cavazos

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